But & And – A Short Short Story

But and And

She was stuck in the middle of somewhere but wasn’t sure where that was and that made her feel lost and scared but she did like her shirt and how her necklace matched her hair but she was self-conscious about her freckles because it was so weird that she had only three of them in each location on her face and she did like her new eyelash extensions that she had never used before but were given to her by her friend who she thought she might see so she wore them but now she doubted it because she didn’t know where she was even though she knew she was somewhere and then her ears started burning bright red which was not usual because she was usually blue but it made her look around and she saw a teepee in the distance not far from a big city that only confused her because she knew she had somewhere to go now but wasn’t sure where because they both looked attractive and both her ears were burning meaning both places were talking about her so she decided to wait and think about it some more.

The End

The Woman at the Motel – A Short Short Story

The Woman at the Motel

A woman named Nancy at the Del Mar Motel who has 3 kids and Dolce & Gabbana sunglasses & always reads the sports section because her dad was a high school football coach who talked about her son with ADHD & Tourette Syndrome whom they adopted from the next town over in Orange County and took to Hawaii on his 6th birthday and hoped he didn’t think he would always get trips like that and who is trying to think ahead about real estate for her kids’ future.

The End

 


Drawing and story by Marty Coleman


People on the Street – London and Paris

Street Photography

One of my favorite things to do when I go on vacation is street photography, meaning not photos of streets, but photos of the action on the street. It really means action most anywhere; in stores, at famous monuments, etc. The only defining factor is that it is spontaneous and, for the most part, not posed.

In the early summer of 2015 my wife Linda, daughter Caitlin, and I went to London and Paris. These are a selection of the photos I took on the streets of these two amazing cities. Each photo I think captures an essence of the moment in a way that staged photos can’t. After each photo I have given some ideas of what I was looking for and what you can also look for when you do street photography.


THE MOMENT

Selfie Kiss at Versailles  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

The main thing about street photography is you have to be ready. No fumbling, no settings, no focusing even. You have to get that shot as if it’s a breaking news story, right now right there. In this case I had already noticed her bright red (and long) fingernails so I was attuned to her.

I also knew there was a rare empty space not filled with people behind her and watched for a moment to see if something interesting might compose itself. And when she raised her arm I knew what was coming and raised my camera.

Purchase a Print


BE STIMULATED

Stripes  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Street photography is about visual stimulation. Your eye drives the process and you have to respond quickly. The decision-making has to be immediate or the moment has passed. In this case I already had my finger on the shutter button as I happened to see this woman with the bold striped dress coming towards me. I didn’t think about it I just pushed the button.

The other thing about street photography is the fun of not really knowing what you captured. The stripes were interesting, yes. But getting the other striped shirt and the person walking right between them was fun to discover later and it’s what makes the photograph as a whole visually stimulating to me.

Purchase a print


LOOK FOR CONTRASTS

Standing Nudes, Sitting People  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Juxtaposition is a key element in the commentary in much street photography. The interaction between people, objects, environment, and light add to the visual conversation.

In this case the verticality and solidity of the sculptures played off the very slack and loose poses of the sitters. I loved the humorous juxtaposition of their poses and of the nudity vs clothing so I pushed the button.  If you notice, the camera is not up at my eye level. I had it around my neck hanging to my stomach and took the photo from there. I could have chosen to raise it up, it wouldn’t have bothered me to be seen taking the photo, but having the sitters be midway between the sculptures was key to the composition and feeling of the image so I kept the camera at waist level.

Purchase a print


THERE ARE ANGLES AMONG US

Bride and Locks  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Doing street photography means you are always looking for great angles. Sometimes that means you have to imagine what something would look like from a different angle from the one you are at. Keeping the camera at your face and thinking that is the only image available limits your choices considerably.

In this case there was no doubt I was going to take a photo of this bride on the bridge full of locks. The question was what angle would best tell the story? There was way to much clutter in the image when I was standing up so I squatted down very low and put the camera even lower, almost to the ground, to get the shot.  This is one of the reasons an articulating screen at the back of the camera is essential to street photography, so you can see very low or very high.

Purchase a print


WHERE TO POINT

Two Sisters and a Ceiling  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Not only is what height your camera is at something to consider, but where it is pointing as well. To limit yourself to only pointing forward or slightly up or down means once again you are limiting yourself and the possible images you can get.

Here I, along with thousands of others, were looking up at the ceilings in Versailles. But what I saw wasn’t just the ceilings but everyone else taking photos of those same ceilings. I angled my camera from my waist directly up to catch that phenomenon.  In this photo I was walking quickly and just barely caught these two women out of the corner of my eye. I turned, snapped and moved on. I didn’t know what the image looked like until well after we were done with the tour and on the way back to Paris on the train.

Purchase a print


BE READY FOR THE UNEXPECTED

Bride and Groom at Notre Dame  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

In street photography something unexpected is always just around the corner. The best shots aren’t always going to be in main areas of tourism or activity. They more likely will happen as you are walking to or from those areas. Having your camera on and ready (and with the lens cap off!) is critical. I can’t tell you how many photos I have missed in my life because of one of these reasons.

Having your camera set to multiple photos at one time is also key. In this case, I saw the bride and groom walking down the street and kept my finger on the button until just the right time and then held it down. I got about 3-4 shots and was able to choose the best one from the bunch as a result.

Purchase a print


ANTICIPATE THE ANTICIPATION

Place to Kiss  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

When we walk around a city we see the fluidity of time and motion. As a result we often don’t see examples of anticipation. But the still photograph from the street can often capture just that right moment.

Here these two people were drinking and talking and flirting, all the while seeming to hem and haw about the funny sign right next to them. I got the feeling they wanted to kiss but weren’t sure how to go about it, especially when there was a sign directing them to do so!

Purchase a print


MOTION IS YOUR FRIEND

Four Portraits at the Musée d’Orsay  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

When you do street photography you are going to get motion. And motion means blur. This is not a bad thing. Blur is a tool of expression. It expresses movement, action, direction, energy. Don’t reject an image because of it but instead evaluate how the blur may help the image.

There is usually no more static place in the world than a museum. But people walk around them all the time and that means movement. Here I was able to capture a bit of both the action and the static at the same time. I had a number of other shots from right around this same moment, but this was by far the best because the blur of the woman in the stripes on the far left balanced out the strong and isolated image of the nude by Renoir on the right.

Purchase a print


ISOLATE TO COMMUNICATE

The Singer and the Thames  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Isolation is another important element in street photography.  Isolation means visual power and weight and it can be used to tell a story.

On the banks of the Thames in London I was watching the hundreds of people go by before I went in to see the Tate Modern Museum.  This singer with his small speaker and music machine was entertaining the crowd. But all I saw was him alone next to this giant river. I set myself up to capture an image that showed how I saw him in the midst of the crowd.

Purchase a print


STREET IS STYLE

The Fascinator  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Style is everywhere on the street. Ignore it and you miss a million fantastic shots. Find it and you will have a never-ending well of ideas and opportunities.

While we were in London we took the train into a certain station to transfer.  When we got off we started seeing an unexpected amount of men and women dressed to the nines. I mean they were really going all out. If it had been on a weekend night it would maybe make sense. But this was at 9am on a weekday morning. What was going on? I didn’t know, but I knew I was going to have my camera ready to go. This woman was walking by with panache and purpose and I immediately angled myself to make sure I got a photo as she passed.

Later we discovered it was the Queen’s Day at the races and everyone was going to the station to travel out to the track.

Purchase a print


TRUE EXPRESSIONS

The Woman at the Seine  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

In staged photos we most often will see a lot of people smiling.  But staged smiling usually only says one thing. What is great in street photography is to find true expressions that aren’t staged. That are a result of a person’s true feelings coming out.

Here that feeling is sublime joy and happiness. It can be felt in much more than just the Mona Lisa smile she has. It’s in everything her face and body is doing.  Always be ready for that moment where you are capturing true feelings because those are what will let people know as much about a place as any monument or building.

Purchase a print


THE COURAGE OF THE PERSONAL

Mannequin and Walker  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Street photography can get very personal. People can see you take photos, some think it is a violation, others couldn’t care less and you don’t know who will react how. If you believe in capturing the life of the street you have to be bold and courageous to do so. Sometimes that means you have the opportunity to ask permission but other times you do not.

I was walking near our Airbnb apartment in Paris early one morning, on my way to the cafe where I had been drawing each morning when I saw this scene. I was focused on the mannequin in the window with the sunrise reflecting off the building when this woman walked by. She had been looking down at her phone but looked up right as a took the shot.  She was past me in a second and that was that. I don’t know what her emotions were about seeing me as I was taking pictures and I am not assuming I know. But I had to have the courage to take the photo without knowing that.

Purchase a print


SHOW WHAT IS SEEN

Seeing Versailles  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Bold graphic elements are everywhere in street photography. Windows, doors, people can all be seen not as what they are but as formal devices to frame or direct an image compositionally.  This is especially true if you are going to shoot in Black and White or are thinking in terms of BW when you later work on the image.

I didn’t see an image of Versailles here. I saw an image of how Versailles is to be seen.  Finding a set of elements composed so they show a third person’s view is something for which you should always be on the look out. It tells a story much more effectively than just a photo of a place.

Purchase a print


LINES OF MYSTERY

Escalation  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

Lines direct one’s vision. Finding those lines and using them to create mystery or wonder is one of the joys of street photography.

We were headed down into the London Tube and I was standing behind this elegantly styled woman. All I could see were all these lines converging behind her and really wanted to capture that. Once again I simply took the photo from where the camera was hanging around my neck.  Being low created a giant black shape in the middle of the image. We know it is her but visually it’s a void, allowing one to imagine what is behind even more than imagining her.

Purchase a print


THE GEOMETRY OF HUMANITY

The Poser in Paris  –  © Marty Coleman 2017

People are always posing for something. Street photography allows you to capture when people are posing, not for you, but for someone else.

We took a walk along the banks of the Seine and what caught my eye first was the profound geometry everywhere. The lines were formal and abstract and I was trying to find just the right combination of elements when I saw this woman posing for a caricaturist.  She leant just the right amount of warmth and humanity to the otherwise severe composition so I took a number of photos. This one, with her gaze going completely off camera, was the one that really expressed how I saw Paris at that moment.

Purchase a print


TO FINISH UP

So, there you have it. A little tour of London and Paris. It’s probably a lot different from what you would find among tourist photos. But maybe these photos give you a different understanding of the two cities. One that is more about the mood and feeling of a place than a recitation of its monuments and objects.  That is what street photography can do for you and your appreciation for a place.  It is also what it can do for others who see the photos, giving them an idea of what it’s like to be in and around a city, to feel they know a place at a more intimate level.

Give street photography a try, you won’t regret. And by all means let me know how it goes and let me see some of your photos!

Marty


Each of these photos is for sale. Price is $50.00 plus shipping.  Please contact me at marty@napkindad.com if you are interested. Give me the name of the piece and we can go from there!  I can receive payment and ship internationally.

Allowing Our Purpose – Universe #1


Purchase the original drawing | purchase a print | available framed!


The Immature Purpose

The immature among us like to divide things into extreme categories.

A simplistic religious person wants to see anyone who doesn’t believe in a personal God as having no purpose. They want to feel sorry for them because it meets their need to feel enlightened and special. They have  a purpose from God and these other people don’t.

A simplistic non-religious on the other hand wants to see a religious person as living under an illusion of purpose. They want to feel sorry for them because it meets their need to feel intellectually superior.  Their existence and happiness is enough of a purpose and those other people are woefully deluded.

The Mature Purpose

The mature among us are willing to admit that the complexity of life doesn’t lend itself to dividing things up so neatly.

A complex religious person will admit that while they believe they have a purpose directed from God there are many times they don’t know that purpose. They also will admit that that purpose is constantly evolving as they grow. It might be growth in terms of age and experience or perhaps growth in their spiritual relationship with God.  They will also admit that not knowing their purpose in life at every single moment is not critical to their success in life. There are great mysteries they admit to and are willing to live with that.  They also will learn that to judge others’ journey of finding purpose (or not) is not one of their purposes in life.

A complex non-religious person will admit that while they are often satisfied with their purpose simply being to exist and be happy, there are other times they doubt and wonder about that, and are sometimes drawn to see if their might be more than that. They will also admit that they sometimes admire the surety with which a religious person feels their purpose so strongly. They will realize that just as they are on their journey of finding purpose (or not) so others are as well and it’s not their purpose in life to judge other people’s journeys.

Where are you in your search for purpose (or not)?


Drawing, quote and commentary © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com


 

The Poem About My Senses

poeminherhead-2016_sm

The Poem About My Senses

I have a poem in my head,
Not fancy or complete.
Actually pretty basic,
mundane but pretty sweet.

Don’t know what it’s all about,
That’s the point of it I think.
But I know It’s sort of funny,
And includes the color pink.

It includes the smell of coffee,
And maybe the passage of time.
I don’t really remember,
But it’s simple in it’s rhyme.

It has an image of windows,
With sun filtering the air.
That flows all around me,
And lands on my hair.

There is a taste of a croissant,
Somewhere in the verse.
And the texture of an almond,
as it falls into my purse.

That’s all I remember,
Of the poem within my head.
It makes me glad to to be alive,
Instead of being dead.


Drawing and poem © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com


This drawing was done at the Glenpool, Oklahoma Starbucks.

It is available for purchase, either the original for $100.00, or a print for $25.00


 

Making and Keeping Friends – Friendship #5

friendship5-2016_sm

Purchase the original drawing | purchase a print | matte and frame available.

The Other Thing I Did

While I was drawing on napkins for my daughters back in the 90s I also was doing something else. I was saying goodbye to them at the door. Each day I would say pretty much the same thing. I would say I love you then I would say “Don’t forget, Make good friends and keep good friends.”  Why I came up with that particular phrase, I don’t know. But I would say it every day.  And I meant it.

Community

What I wanted for them was a growing, vibrant community. A community doesn’t happen without friendships, a growing community doesn’t happen without new friendships and a vibrant community doesn’t happen without diverse friends. That is why I said that to them.

The Purpose of Diversity

When I say diverse, I don’t mean you have to have a rainbow of skin colors to prove it. I think that would help but only insofar as it’s an outward visual of what is an internal diversity. In other words, the important thing isn’t that your friend has dark brown, red, orange, alabaster or freckled skin. What is important is that you are experiencing, at least some of the time, a person with a life experience different than yours. A life experience you can learn and grow from knowing AND that your friend can benefit from by knowing you.

Courage Over Fear

How do you gather such friends? Yes, by going out into the world. But that isn’t enough. You have to go out into the world with courage and an open heart or else you will simply be carrying your fear around with you and will miss meeting those new friends.


Drawing and commentary © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com

Quote by Yours Truly


 

The Blue Woman and the Red Bird – a Friendship Story

sadgirl_2015-2016_sm

The Blue Woman and the Red Bird 

One day the blue woman was walking to the edge of the volcano so she could jump in and kill herself. On the way she came across a red bird standing on a dead branch near the trail she was on. The red bird started talking to the blue woman and what she said made her cry. They weren’t tears of sadness but tears of joy because what the red bird said was that she was lonely being the only red bird in the area and wanted someone to talk to who would understand her. She saw the blue woman walking by and since she had never seen a blue woman before she figured she had to feel pretty lonely as well. She was right. The blue woman felt very lonely.  But thanks to the red bird noticing her and saying something she didn’t feel that way anymore. The red bird and the blue woman became great friends and accompanied each other everywhere together until the end of their days. And they were never lonely again.

The End


Drawing and story © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com


 

Four That Took a Decade – Sketchbook History Tour

I’ve been drawing in sketchbooks for many decades now. I sometimes go back and revisit older books just to see what I did or to show others. Recently I did this with a series of sketchbooks from 2000 on.  I discovered a number of drawings I wanted to work on more, mostly in coloring and shading. Here are 4 drawings from this endeavor.

If you know my recent work you know I often write short stories to accompany my drawings. In these drawings though the stories or observations were written directly on the page.  I specifically went for stream of consciousness oriented narratives with long run-on sentences that imitated the way I actually experienced and thought about the moment.


HOOPS

hoopearrings-2016_sm

‘Hoops’ 2003-2016

The classy student studying with the grey eyeshadow and glimmery lips while her boyfriend who looks young and too young for her reads a magazine with three bug bits on his ankle in a row looking like a constellation and she uses a blue and red pen & huge hoop earrings, the biggest i’ve ever seen with her left hand and very small delicate fingers with no polish in Norman, Oklahoma on a summer’s night that threatens to rain while the two girls behind her wear red Sooner shirts and read & talk about the young star who is too thin and I draw instead of read the manual on the class I am here for while I catch a bright pink purse pass by a tall guy sitting with yellow.


 VEINS

veins_2003-2016_sm

‘Veins’ 2003-2016

The tall thin woman at Panera with great veins reading her bible and taking notes and eating a bagel and ignoring that I am drawing her while she drinks coffee and contemplates divorce on a hot summer morning in Tulsa.


SPLOTCHY

splotchy-2016_sm

‘Splotchy’ 2003-2016

The woman looked like she had been crying; splotchy skin, red eyes & nose but she had not.


RUBY LIPGLOSS

rubylipstick-2016_sm

‘Ruby Lipgloss’ 2004-2016

The woman with the ruby lip gloss and zig zag parted hair looking at the person in the door and wondering if he noticed her perfume when he passed as she made a call to her boyfriend to ask if he picked up mascara for her.


Drawings and stories © 2016 Marty Coleman | napkindad.com


 

My Hope

myhope

 

My father and my mother taught me a very important thing about electing our President.

That is always, no matter if your side wins or loses, hope the best. Hope that the new President is better than what you think he is. Hope that the actions aren’t as severe as his rhetoric has been. Hope that the gravity of the office will infuse this person with a conscience you don’t believe he possesses. Hope that our system of government, with its checks and balances, will wear down the rough edges so people aren’t hurt by his actions and words.

I hope these things, not because I am naive, but because I believe it’s the best way for me personally to move forward as a citizen of the United States.

What do you think?

Subscribe and Join TheNapkin Kin

Get on the mailing list and get The Napkin Newsletter once a month and get a review of the months postings, with extra resources and features that will make your brain bigger and your day better!

 

Thanks, You Are Now A Napkin Kin!

%d bloggers like this: